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Jug

Artist/Maker:
Beard, Benjamin __Attributed to
Place Made:
Guilford County North Carolina United States of America
Date Made:
1810-1830
Medium:
stoneware
Dimensions:
HOA: 13 1/2″; DIA: of base 5 1/2″
Accession Number:
5529
Description:
Medium stoneware jug with a pulled handle with an ovoid body and narrow base.The terminal of the handle is a point. The mouth is folded over with two overlapping rolls. The jug has three incised rings decorating the upper neck. The upper body has an obvious green glaze with evidence of running. The majority of the body is matte in finish and brown in color.

MAKER: Benjamin Beard (1774-1841) was a Quaker stoneware potter working in southwestern Guilford County, North Carolina. He was a son of William and Lavina (Gifford) Beard, whose familes were part of the large Quaker migration from Nantucket Island, Massachusetts to Piedmont North Carolina in the early 1770s. Benjamin was born in Guilford County shortly after his family’s migration. They were members of Deep River Monthly Meeting. Benjamin’s probate inventory documents his career as a potter listing one pipe mold, two large jugs, two old jugs and a potter’s lathe [wheel]. A similarly glazed stoneware jar signed by Beard is also in the MESDA Collection (#5392).

Guilford County, NC, Inventories 10, 1835-1842, p. 546.

Zug, Charles G. III. Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 1986.

Benjamin Beard (1774-1841) was a Quaker potter working in southwestern Guilford County, North Carolina. He was a son of William and Lavina (Gifford) Beard, whose familes were part of the large Quaker migration from Nantucket Island, Massachusetts to Piedmont North Carolina in the early 1770s. They were members of Deep River Monthly Meeting. Benjamin’s probate inventory documents his career as a potter listing one pipe mold, two large jugs, two old jugs and a potter’s lathe [wheel]. (Guilford County, NC, Inventories 10, 1835-1842, p. 546.)

Zug, Charles G. III. “Turners and Burners: The Folk Potters of North Carolina.” Chapel Hill, NC: UNC Press, 1986.

History:
History of ownership in the Macy family of Quaker cabinetmakers in southern Guilford County. It was probably made by one of the Quaker potters in the area, such as Benjamin Beard, and is considered one to be of the earliest known examples of North Carolina stoneware.
Credit Line:
Gift of William Ivey